Welcome Molly, free HTML 5 talk on Saturday

I’m delighted that my old mate Molly Holzschlag is joining the Web Evangelist team at Opera.

I’ve known Molly since 2001. She was a journalist covering a Wrox XML conference I was helping run in Las Vegas. A colleague of mine, Karli Watson had a quickie, tacky Vegas wedding and Molly and I attended.

Two years later, I was searching for someone to co-author a book with me about usability, and found Molly. We were both unaware that we’d met before until halfway through our collaboration. Usability: the site speaks for itself sold poorly (and taught me some vital lessons about web developers and how they differ from programmers) but it cemented my friendship with Molly. She’s been to my house, eaten my evil chicken, charmed my children (“a real American!”) and helped me drink a bottle of vodka.

It’s great to work with old friends like Molly, Millsy and Jon Hicks, and new friends like “Zip Pin” Zi Bin, Shwetank, David-not-Dave, Andreas “Frisky” Bovens and Henny “Henry” Swan. One of the comments on Molly’s blog is “That’s some team Opera are building.” Fuck, yeah. And I’m delighted to be a part of it.

Why the mobile web must mirror the desktop

A long interview with me about One Web and the importance of web standards for device-independent development, which will presumably get Luca all foamy at the mouth again. Originally published in .net magazine a month ago.

Free talks on HTML 5, ARIA and JavaScript, Birmingham 21 February

I’ll be presenting “Confessions of a mad scientist: my HTML 5 experiments” on Saturday at 4pm in Birimingham (meet at 2pm for beers).

Also on the bill is Stuart Langridge on JavaScript and another old friend, Matt Machell, discussing ARIA. It’s free, so see you there? (More details)

6 Responses to “ Welcome Molly, free HTML 5 talk on Saturday ”

Comment by Dave

An excellent catch that, for Opera. I met Molly at Mix08 where we discovered it was 10 years since that Wrox conference when we’d first (and last) met. Large quantities of alcohol were involved both times.

Comment by Bruce

Sold poorly, yes. At that point web developers needed definites, and that book didn’t give definites.

They wanted strong community leaders who espoused an orthodoxy: Tables were evil; CSS was good. Microsoft was always evil; Apple could do no wrong. Flash was evil; html was good (or, for the Flash guys, Flash was always wondrous and html always disastrous for branding and cross-browser predictability.)

Comment by ppk

You Brits will never learn.

One drinks beer *after* the sessions, and not before. Otherwise everybody will be too drunk to appreciate HTML5 or ARIA. (JavaScript can be appreciated drunk or sober, though.)