Review: Build Mobile Websites by Castledine, Eftos, Wheeler

I got this book free in lieu of payment for my Sitepoint article Notes on Designing Websites for the Asian Market. When it arrived, I looked in the index for “Opera” and found no entry at all. As this is a book is called “Build Mobile Websites and Apps for Smart Devices” and is about designing mobile websites (not just apps), I decided that the book would be another iOS wankathon, and put it immediately in my recycling pile. (“iOS wankathon” is the technical term employed by medical professionals to describe articles/ books/ conference talks that stupidly assume all mobile users have iPhones or other webkit-based browsers.)

Luckily, I decided to give it a go and picked it up just before getting a flight. It’s actually a really good book, with only one webkit wank (a very low number when “apps for smart devices” is in the title).

There’s good information on responsive web design, although it doesn’t replace Ethan Marcotte’s book, it summarises well. The second edition should add information on CSS Device Adaptation (“CSS viewport”) now that IE10 and Opera support it.

I found the chapter on design for mobile very useful with its different patterns for organising information. The chapter “markup for mobile” was less so, probably because I know more about markup than design.

One slight niggle – in an example app, the use of ellipsis is shown by including the name of a person “I am a celebrity with an incredibly long name for some unfathomable reason”. Long names seem quite common in Thailand, Sri Lanka, Russia, Greece etc; it’s only “unfathomable” if you think in the context of English names.

The only example of webkit wanking comes in the “Mobile web apps” chapter. In order to navigate from page to page, -webkit-animation is used with no other vendor prefixes. The authors have ensured that a simplified page swap is available on other browsers, but that tests WebKitTransitionEvent in JavaScript. Why not just use all the vendor prefixes and the non-prefixed version, and only then fallback to a “simplified” page swap? It’s particularly remiss when Firefox supported Animations from May 2011, while the book was published in June 2011.

Better still would be to ensure that vital functionality like navigation is available everywhere and only then progressively enhanced.

In conclusion, this is a decent book. Client-pleasing stuff such as touch, accelerometer, geolocation is covered. But while it was languishing on my shelf more cutting-edge features have become available. You can still learn from this book now, especially if you’re interested in sites that work well on mobile rather than all-singing all-dancing applications, but it would be good to see a second edition that addresses getUserMedia and proper cross-browser vendor prefixing.

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