Archive for the 'accessibility web standards' Category

Reading List

My first Reading List since leaving Opera, and it’s a biggie!

Leaving Opera

After Opera’s consumer products (browsers and Opera Max) were taken over by a Chinese consortium on 4 November, Opera and I are parting ways by mutual agreement. I’m no longer a representative or spokesman for Opera products, or the Opera brand.

In my eight and a half years at Opera, I’ve done well over 150 conference talks, visited the USA numerous times; Norway dozens of times; Netherlands seven times; Spain and France four times; Poland, Germany, Romania and Russia three times; India three times (once for nearly a month, once for three days!); Indonesia, Italy, Denmark twice; Japan, Australia, Bulgaria, Sweden, Israel and South Africa.

Opera gave me the freedom to experiment with HTML5, and co-author a book with Remy Sharp; to play around and agitate for responsive images (now in all browsers!); to mentor my friend Lu Yu to become a speaker; to donate speaker fees to an NGO to buy computers for a Cambodian village school, and to sponsor conference diversity tickets so our industry can maybe become less of a white male club.

I’m hugely grateful to those who hired me and managed me for allowing and encouraging this freedom: thank you, Live Leer, Jan Standal, Andreas Bovens, Karin Greve-Isdahl.

I’m proud of the products I worked on, and hope they’ll be stewarded well in the future. I’m proud that Andreas Bovens and I got Progressive Web Apps into Opera for Android. I’m proud of the work I’ve done educating Western developers about the rest of the world. It’s been a joy to meet and work with many, many great people in Opera (shout out to Devrel and PR/ Marketing!), friends in other browsers, and across the industry. Thank you to all of you.

I wish all my ex-colleagues —those who are also leaving, and those who are staying— every success. I’ll be cheering you on.

Yesterday was my last working day. And now, as it’s the first week after my 50th birthday, I’m taking a short break to get over a mild flare-up of my Multiple Sclerosis, and to think about what comes next. Top of the list is training to be a buddhist monk while teaching poor/refugee children in South East Asia, or reprising my 1990s life on a beach earning money playing guitar and reading tarot cards. But those won’t pay my kids through university.

I most enjoy being a public face of an organisation that aims —however modestly— to increase the sum of human happiness via the Web and tech. If you have a job opening that you think would be suitable, and you’d like to rent a Bruce of your own, please get in touch (bruce @ this domain). I’ll still be avidly keeping up with the web industry, and conference talk invitations are still encouraged.

BRB.

Addendum 30 November 2016. It makes me sad to announce that a group of colleagues – Andreas Bovens, Mathias Bynens, Shwetank Dixit and Vadim Makeev (the entire Opera Developer Relations Team) – who, over the course of the last eight years, have become friends, are also leaving. I wholeheartedly recommend each to any future employer.

Reading List

This week I’ve been reading lots of stuff about the (possible) future of the Web: Virtual and Augmented Reality, Context-Awareness and other interesting stuff.

Notes on Google’s HTTPS Usage report

On Friday’s reading list I linked to Google’s HTTPS Usage report which said that

Secure web browsing through HTTPS is becoming the norm. Desktop users load more than half of the pages they view over HTTPS and spend two-thirds of their time on HTTPS pages. HTTPS is less prevalent on mobile devices, but we see an upward trend there, too.

(The report is undated, but as the data continues after October 2016, I assume it’s current. As an aside, please put dates on research and stats you publish!)

Erik Isaksen tweeted me asking “I’m wondering why ‘especially on desktop”. I replied with my speculations, reproduced here in longer form :

Despite the rise in mobile use, desktop numbers aren’t declining, and perhaps many people do as I do: I might search and compare products on my mobile, but I actually do the purchases on my desktop machine. It’s a lot easier to type on a full-sized keyboard than a virtual keyboard, and purchases on the web are still laborious. I doubt it’s just me; generally, users abandon mobile purchases twice as often as desktop purchases. (That figure is from Google’s tutorial on the Payment Request API. I’m eagerly awaiting completion of Opera’s implementation.)

Similarly, I never do online banking on my mobile, I always use my desktop machine which has a direct line into it. (Even though I know that my bank’s website is HTTPS. But when I visit my branch, I notice their internal systems are all using IE6…)

It’s also worth bearing in mind that many of the regions that are mobile-first are home to large populations of unbanked people, or populations who don’t use credit cards much. There’s a lot less imperative to offer local websites securely when there is no money changing hands through them, while the services that are popular everywhere (Gmail, Facebook etc) are already HTTPS.

I’m told that HTTPS is comparatively expensive for site owners in the developing economies, and advertising revenues are declining as more and more people use Ad-blockers: 36% of smartphone users in Asia-Pacific use ad-blockers; two-thirds of people in India and Indonesia (source) and statistics from Opera’s built-inn ad-blocker shows that Indonesia has the most ads blocked per person in the region.

I suppose the crux of my speculation is: do people perform different kinds of tasks on mobile and desktop? Some tasks – banking, purchasing – require more convoluted input and are thus more suited to desktop devices with a full-sized keyboard, and such tasks are performed on HTTPS sites.

But this is only speculation. Anyone have any hard data on why HTTPS is more prevalent on desktop than mobile?

8 November 2016: Amelia Bellamy-Royds suggested on Twitter “No hard data, but my guess: secure websites for social media, email, etc., are replaced by native apps on mobile.” This certainly maps to my own experience, as I used the Gmail and Twitter apps on Android.

Reading List

Reading List

Reading List

Reading List

Reading List

Reading List