Archive for the 'reading list' Category

Reading List

Reading List

The <picture> element

I proposed it 2.5 years ago. Loads of cleverer people worked hard on it. The RICG is holding a fundraiser to pay developer Yoav Weiss to code it in Blink and WebKit. Opera (my employer) contributed $1000, dozens of individual developers – people like you – pledged money as well.

The inital target of $10,000 has been reached, but don’t let that deter you from contributing – it means Yoav can work for longer, and maybe even have a break for a coffee and a piss now and then. (Coders, eh?)

Standards ‘n’ Shiz

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Reading List

Reading List

Reading List

Bridging the gap between native and web

  • Installable web apps by PPK: “The mobile browser “bookmark” function should become “install” and place an icon on the home screen. This icon starts up the web page or web app; likely from local memory.” Good article, though I disagree with the idea that the web app is a local copy – that’s re-inventing Widgets. It should be the live, instantly-updatable web site, “offlinerificated” with Service Workers.
  • Meanwhile, Google’s Paul Kinlan disagrees: Add to Home Screen Is Not What the Web Needs. Is It?
  • Manifest for bookmarking web applications draft spec
  • A Review of apps that use network information – research by @marcosc on whether such API on Web is needed (or possible)
  • The state of standalone apps on iOS – “we examined 360 web applications that claim to be capable of running “standalone” in iOS (i.e., the web application asserts that it’s usable outside the context of iOS’s default browser). We put those claims to the test by manually checking if the apps could, in fact, be used as standalone.”
  • Service Worker + Push API – “outlines an API which integrates with the Service Worker to enable delivery of push messages to applications which do not have visible tabs”
  • Media playback restrictions in Blink – “Blink and WebKit have a setting for requiring a “user gesture” to play or pause an audio or video element … this gets in the way of reasonable use cases like games or playlists, and developers are not impressed … as an experiment we’ve removed the restrictions in Opera beta for Android. However, I’ve also found a workaround for current browsers.”

Standards

Misc

Reading List

Regions to be cheerful?

The Web has been buzzing with the news that Blink has said “nope” to Adobe’s CSS Regions spec. Here some hand-picked links about that, and the general state of CSS Regions spec.

Other suggestions for text fragmentation are available, such as CSS Overflow Module Level 3, CSS Fragmentation Module Level 3 and (related) CSS Figures.

Standards

  • HTML is too complex – “unless there is an immediate visual or behavioural benefit to using an element, most people will ignore it”. Some real food for thought in this sentence.
  • A World Managed By Apps Is Closed For Those Without A Smartphone – “Every time you make a service or device that can only be managed from an app, you are basically adding to a systematic poor tax. You make it easier for those comfortable, with great smartphones in their hand, to get shit done, while not spreading that benefit to those without the magic box. You deepen economic entrenchment.”
  • Why is Progressive Enhancement so unpopular? by fellow old-timer, Drew McLellan
  • [HTML Imports]: Sync, async, -ish?. If you’re importing a web component (you hypercool ninja, you) should the whole render be blocked until the component can be drawn? Of course not, argues Jank Archibald persuasively. Elsewhere he writes, “Instead, we should follow the default behaviour of <img>. An <img> doesn’t block parsing or rendering, the image appears when it is loaded. The developer can reserve an area for the image to change the reflowing behaviour.” Not as daft as he looks, that Jake.
  • Why does this spec replicate HTML features? – Imagine we have a manifest file for web apps, that pretty much duplicates what HTML can do with <meta> elements already. If both are present, which should “win”?
  • Nine Things to Expect from HTTP/2 by Mark Nottingham, chair of the IETF HTTPbis Working Group. So he knows.
  • will-change: a CSS hint to browser that you know its appearance will change, so it can make any optimisations, eg paint it to another layer immediately for faster animation. Replaces hacks like translateZ(0) and -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden.
  • Pointer Events Progress: Mozilla and Blink Communities Reach a Significant Engineering Milestone – synergies between Microsoft, Blink and Mozilla. Who’s missing, I wonder?

Scampi Bug Yeti

As Mike Taylr points out, “Scampi Bug Yeti” is an anagram of “Spec Ambiguity”. Sometimes, people moan that the specification process of web standards is grindingly slow and laborious with too much detail etc. But the reality is that specs that are amibiguous or not tightly defined cause problems with interoperability. For example,

Reading List

Articles that I’ve tweeted this week. Not necessarily fact-checked, or endorsed.

Standards

Browsers, techniques, resources

I’m taking a break to get some sun and even a bit of culture. Blog comments are disabled to stop comment spam. See you in a little while. XXX

Reading List

Closing the gap between web and native

Standards

  • The picture Element Editor’s Draft, 2 January 2013. Lo, <picture> rises from the flames like a phoenix. This re-written spec combines the best bits of srcset and src-n in a webby markup syntax. The most important difference from “old” <picture> is that the <source> elements control the src of the <img> element; thus, <img> is an integral part of the construct rather than simply fallback (and thus is unlikely to be omitted by authors, so “old” browsers won’t be left out.)
  • Input Method Editor API – interacting with virtual keyboards, handwriting pads etc. Particularly useful for Chinese/ Japanese/ Korean.
  • What is the DOM? – a beginner’s guide from Chris Coyier
  • We’re About to Lose Net Neutrality — And the Internet as We Know It by A Lawyer
  • REMs, fallback and support by Stu Robson. TL;DR – add one line of CSS and make sure your font-sizes work everywhere

Industry

Phwooar

Reading List

Standards

Industry

Porn Filter stupidity

Reading List

Bridging the gap between native and web

Woo, Standards!

Industry

Misc